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You Can Make a Difference

Building and maintaining a positive relationship with your toddler or preschooler supports their healthy development. These videos developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention helps parents manage challenging behavior in a positive way.

Talking With Your Child

In Vermont, to speak to an <i>HMG</i> VT Child Developmental Specialist dial 2-1-1 x6 .
In Vermont, to speak to an <i>HMG</i> VT Child Developmental Specialist dial 2-1-1 x6 .

Giving Directions

In Vermont, to speak to an <i>HMG</i> VT Child Developmental Specialist dial 2-1-1 x6 .
In Vermont, to speak to an <i>HMG</i> VT Child Developmental Specialist dial 2-1-1 x6 .

Using Discipline & Consequences

In Vermont, to speak to an <i>HMG</i> VT Child Developmental Specialist dial 2-1-1 x6 .
In Vermont, to speak to an <i>HMG</i> VT Child Developmental Specialist dial 2-1-1 x6 .

Avoiding Temper Tantrums & Meltdowns With Structure & Rules

In Vermont, to speak to an <i>HMG</i> VT Child Developmental Specialist dial 2-1-1 x6 .
In Vermont, to speak to an <i>HMG</i> VT Child Developmental Specialist dial 2-1-1 x6 .

TEXT HMGVT TO

898211

Help Me Grow Vermont

Vermont Department of Health

PO Box 70

 Burlington, VT  05402-0070

802-863-7333

info@helpmegrowvt.org

DISCLAIMER: The information contained in this website is for general information purposes only. We are not responsible for the content or reliability of any other websites to which we provide a link and do not necessarily endorse the views expressed within them. Any personal information submitted via this website will be used solely by Help Me Grow affiliates and will not be disclosed to external entities outside of the network.

COPYRIGHT © 2017 | HELP ME GROW VERMONT

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  • KEYS FOR COMMUNICATING WITH YOUR CHILD

    • Praise your child when she does something right. The more you praise a behavior, the more likely it is your child will behave the same way again.
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    • Pay attention to your child when he is talking to you or trying to communicate with you. Giving him your full attention will help you understand what he is telling you. It will also make him feel like you care about what he has to say.
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    • Set aside time each day to talk and play with your child. Creating a special time lets your child know she is important. It also strengthens the bond between the two of you.

     

  • KEYS TO GIVING

    GOOD DIRECTIONS

    • Make sure you have your child’s attention when you give a direction.
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    • Be clear about what you want your child to do and when she needs to do it.
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    • Ask your child to repeat the direction back to you to make sure he understands.
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    • Avoid asking questions when you want your child to do something. Asking a question gives your child the chance to say, “No!”
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    • Give one direction at a time.
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    • Model good listening skills during special playtime and give your child positive attention for good listening.

     

  • KEYS TO CREATING STRUCTURE

      • Use social rewards (like hugs and kisses) more than material rewards (like toys or candy). Social rewards can be given often and are more powerful!
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      • Sticker charts or similar reward programs can help change your child’s behavior.
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      • Ignoring misbehavior means taking away your attention. It helps stop misbehaviors like tantrums, whining, and interrupting.
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      • Distracting your child can help stop misbehaviors. It works by getting your child to think and do something else so he doesn’t continue to misbehave.
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      • Toddlers and preschoolers have short attention spans. Give consequences right after a misbehavior so they can remember what they did that you do not like.
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      • Use consequences that match your child’s age and stage of development.
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  • KEYS TO USING DISCIPLINE & CONSEQUENCES

    • Make sure you have your child’s attention when you give a direction.
    •  
    • Be clear about what you want your child to do and when she needs to do it.
    •  
    • Ask your child to repeat the direction back to you to make sure he understands.
    •  
    • Avoid asking questions when you want your child to do something. Asking a question gives your child the chance to say, “No!”
    •  
    • Give one direction at a time.
    •  
    • Model good listening skills during special playtime and give your child positive attention for good listening.